Hector’s Dolphin

Hectors Dolphin

Hectors Dolphin courtesy of Earthrace Conservation

Status: Endangered Endangered - small

Known as: Hector’s Dolphin, White-headed dolphin, New Zealand Dolphin

Estimated numbers left in wild: 7,000 to 8,000.


Description

Hector’s dolphin is one of the smallest cetaceans, and New Zealand’s only endemic cetacean. This charming little dolphin is only 1.4 meters long at the most, with the males being slightly smaller than the females. At its heaviest, this dolphin does not weigh more than 50 kilograms. Hector’s dolphins do not have the beak usually associated with dolphins in general, but have instead a shorter face which makes them look more ‘whale-like’. The back of this dolphin is light grey or white, with white extending down the front of the face. The throat and undersides are white, while black patches surround the eye region and extend to the rounded flippers. The round dorsal fin and the tail are also black.

Examination of one of the dolphins by Sir James Hector in the last part of the 19th Century resulted in the species being named after him. Hector’s dolphins eat fish and squid and will take whatever fish are available. They also hunt for crabs and flounder on the ocean bottom. The dolphins hunt and live in shallow waters, and tend to stay underwater for only about 90 seconds. The use of echolocation enables the dolphins to find their prey with relative ease.

Hector’s dolphins assemble in small groups of 2 to 10 animals and appear to communicate with one another by clicks, unlike the whistles usually used by most dolphins. These dolphins have a low reproductive rate, with a calf being born only once every 2 to 4 years. The calves remain under their mother’s protection until they are nearly fully grown and able to live independently. Young dolphins, especially, are very playful and will use seaweed as a toy or blow bubbles for amusement. All ages of these dolphins often swim and leap around boats.

Hectors Dolphin Range Map

Yellow: Extant (resident) (Source IUCN Red List)

Location: Hector’s dolphin is found only in the shallow waters around New Zealand’s South Island. A subspecies of Hector’s dolphin, Maui’s dolphin, is even more endangered with only about 110 individuals left. This member of the family lives around North Island.


Conservation

Endangered

Hectors Dolphin

Hectors Dolphin courtesy of Earthrace Conservation

Threats: The nets of commercial and casual fishermen are the greatest threats to Hector’s and Maui’s dolphins. Set nets are often placed out as a means to catch fish in a relatively small area, but can also trap the dolphins which drown in them. Gill-nets used by commercial fisheries pose an even more serious danger, and are directly responsible for the near extinction of Maui’s dolphin. The monofilament used to make the nets is so thin that the dolphins’ echolocation is unable to detect it. Although a few dolphins are able to free themselves from the net, about 150 drown every year. Tourists can also disturb the dolphins and they are, of course, subject to the detrimental effects of pollution. Sharks also prey on Hector’s dolphins.

Conservation efforts: NGOs, such as the World Wildlife Fund, are working to ban gill-nets in all parts of the Hector’s and Maui’s dolphins ranges. Gill-nets have been banned completely around North Island and are only allowed to be set 4 miles offshore around South Island. Sanctuaries for marine mammals have also been established around both islands.

Hectors Dolphin

Hectors Dolphin courtesy of Earthrace Conservation

Hectors Dolphin

Hectors Dolphin courtesy of Earthrace Conservation

Hectors Dolphin

Hectors Dolphin courtesy of James Shook

Hector’s Dolphin Videos


Organisations

Do you know of or are you a part of an organisation that work to conserve the Hector’s Dolphin, then please contact us to have it featured on Our Endangered World.


Dolphin Species


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