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Dama Gazelle: Why Is It Endangered?

Dama Gazelle: Why Is It Endangered?

Dama gazelle or the Addra Gazelle is one of the most endangered animals in Africa, and Dama Gazelles are different from other types of gazelles because Dama Gazelles have horns instead of antlers like other African wildlife. Dima gazelle also stand out for their short ears, which makes it difficult for them to hear predators coming up behind them.

A Group of Dama Gazelle

This species is very similar to a deer, but Dama Gazelle is much smaller than deer with large points on their back legs that they use as weapons against predators. Dama gazelle is on the verge of extinction a critically endangered species!  Dama gazelle live primarily in Sudan.

They are considered to be one of the most endangered animals in Africa, Dama Gazelleonly has an estimated 3,000 Dima Gazelles remaining in the wild. This species is on the brink of extinction because there are many threats that endangerment.

Description

Dama Gazelle is a type of gazelle that is on the verge of extinction. Dama Gazelles are considered to be one of the most endangered animals in Africa, and they live primarily in Sudan.

Dama Gazelles are very different from other types of gazelles because Dama Gazelles have horns instead of antlers like other African wildlife.

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Anatomy and Appearance

Dama Gazelles also stand out for their short ears, which makes it difficult for them to hear predators coming up behind them. Dama Gazelle’s coloring has multiple colors including brown, white, and black stripes on its back.

Dama Gazelle can be found in remote regions with grasslands, primarily the vast plains of the Sahara desert.

Location

The range of the dama gazelle has been greatly restricted, and they are now only found in pockets in Niger, Mali, and Chad in sub-Saharan Africa. These gazelles previously ranged from the west coast of northern Africa to the Nile.

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Dama Gazelle Habitat

The dama gazelle inhabits grasslands, savannah, rough desert grasses, and other semi-arid regions in the north of Africa. It eats acacias, shrubs, grass, and dates and can stand on its hind legs to reach food up to 2 meters off the ground.

The dama gazelle has adapted to its dry environment by obtaining sufficient water from its food when free water is not available. The long legs and light body structure aid this gazelle in dealing with the heat of the desert.

Dama Gazelle Diet and Nutrition

Dama Gazelles are herbivores, meaning that they primarily eat vegetation. Dama Gazelles mainly consume planst, grass and leaves, but they may also eat flowers, seeds, herbs, fruits. Their diet can change with the seasons since the food sources will depend on the available vegetation in the area.

They can eat many types of grass including Dontia spp, Dichanthium annulatum, Dactyloctenium aegyptium , Schismus arabicus, Cynodon dactylon, Sorghum sp. etc.

The Dama Gazelle has teeth that are designed for grazing and can chew tough plants and grasses. They may access water sources by jumping with great force, allowing the Dama Gazelle to move about the region and eat plants and vegetation that other animals cannot reach.

As a result, they require less food than other gazelles. Because this species only gives birth once every two years, they require less food than other gazelles.

Dama Gazelle Mating Habits

This species mating habits include groups of Dama Gazelles that congregate on a regular basis. They are can be seen galloping together in pairs or triples during mating season, and they also do this pre-mating ritual where Dama Gazelles cross paths with each other instead of running away (or fleeing) from each other.

These gazel species are social animals that have strong family ties.

Dama Gazelles are careful about their young because Dama Gazels have been known to stay with their mothers until they are four years old. Dama Gazelles are monogamous, meaning that they mate once or for life.

They have been known to travel long distances to find Dama Gazelle mates. Dama Gazelles have also been known to talk with each other using sounds that scientists do not fully understand.

Dama Gazel Facts

Here are some of the fun facts about Dama Gazel to know

  • Dama Gazelles are herbivores, which means that they eat only plants
  • Dama Gazelles typically live in flatlands and grassy savannas
  • Dama Gazelles has a life span of about 5-7 years
  • Dama Gazel babies are called fawns
  • Dama Gazelle mothers typically give birth to twins
  • Dama Gazelles are unique because they have horns instead of antlers, like most other types of gazelles
  • Dama Gazelles typically live in flatlands and grassy savannas
  • Dama Gazelles live primarily in Sudan
  • Dama Gazelles are considered to be one of the most endangered animals in Africa
  • Dama Gazel meat is considered to be a Dama Gazelle Dama Gazel Dama Gazelles Dama Dama Dama
  • Dama Gazelle coloring provides Dama Gazel with camouflage, which helps Dama Gazelles avoid predators
  • Dama Gazelle coloring provides Dama Gazel with camouflage, which helps Dama Gazelles avoid predators
  • Dama Gazelle babies are able to stand on four legs just a few hours after Dama Gazelles are born.

See Related: Hirola Antelope

Conservation Status

Up-close Photo of Dama Gazelle

Dama Gazelles are a type of gazelle that is on the verge of extinction. Dama Gazelles are considered to be one of the most endangered animals in Africa, and they live primarily in Sudan.

Dama Gazelles are very different from other types of gazelles like the Scimitar Horned Oryx or the Sahara Desert Oryx which is the largest gazelle species because Dama Gazelles have horns instead of antlers like other African wildlife.

Dama Gazelles also stand out for their short ears, which makes it difficult for them to hear predators coming up behind them.

Researchers try to find solutions to Dama Gazelle endangerment by partnering with government agencies and NGOs. They work together to implement conservation and management strategies for Dama Gazelles and other endangered species in order to protect their natural habitats.

Dama Gazelles’ native habitat is being destroyed because of climate change, widespread civil conflict in Sudan, and human wild population growth.

See Related: How Do Animals Adapt to Their Environment?

Dama Gazelle Predator and Threats

As is too often the case, the greatest threat to the dama gazelle comes from man. Poaching and habitat destruction has reduced the number of this gazelle by 80%.

The drought this region has been suffering from has made life even more difficult for the animal, and the extension of the coarse desert grasses and area has brought it into closer contact with humans as it moves to the south in search of forage. It is also preyed upon by such predators as cape hunting dogs, cheetahs, lions, hyenas, and leopards.

The lack of genetic diversity could be another problem to the continued existence of the dama gazelle.

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Conservation efforts

At this point, it appears that captive breeding programs in the breeding season are the best chance for the dama gazelle to survive as a species. Breeding is conducted both in the United States and in European countries.

Fenced-off areas in Senegal, Morocco, and Tunisia have given the dama gazelles some protection, but any wildlife reserves in this region are often poorly policed, increasing the chances of poaching.

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Organizations

Do you know of or are you a part of an organization that works to conserve the Dama Gazelle? Then please contact us to have it featured on Our Endangered World.

Final Thoughts

Dama Gazelle and its Horns

Dama Gazelles are endangered animal that is being threatened by human activity. Droughts, climate change, excessive hunting, civil war in Sudan, and the rapid increase of people have contributed to Dama Gazelle’s endangerment. However, there are conservation efforts happening all over the world to help Dama Gazelles live on.

Organizations work with government agencies and NGOs to implement management strategies for Dama Gazelles as well as other endangered species so they can protect their natural habitats from destruction.

See Related: Reasons Why Animals Should Not Be Kept in Zoos

FAQ

Where do Dama Gazelles live?

Dama Gazelles live in Sudan. Dama Gazelles are considered to be on the verge of extinction mainly because of poaching, border wars, loss of habitat due to sand mining, sand dune retraction, and drought.

What color is Dama Gazelle’s fur and why does it provide Dama Gazel with camouflage?

Dama Gazelle’s fur can be brown to black and is not sharply striped, so Dama Gazelle provides Dama Gazelle with camouflage.

How can Dama Gazelles hear predators coming up behind them when they have short ears that don’t let them hear well?

Dama Gazelles can hear predators coming up behind them because Dama Gazelle’s have a heightened sense of smell. Dama Gazelles often keep their head down to the ground and rely heavily on their strong sense of smell to detect danger.

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